Victor Prevot

Victor Prevot, born in Nancy, France, is a specialist in the banking industry. Victor graduated from the IUP de Finances de Nancy, part of the Université de Nancy, with a Master’s in Retail Banking for Businesses. After a one-year apprenticeship with BNP Paribas, he was hired on full-time and stayed for two and half years as a Risk Analyst. At this point, he decided he wanted to focus his career internationally and decided to travel to Australia on a Working Holiday Visa to pursue his financial career there. However, things did not end up exactly the way he planned and he ended up working on a banana farm, where he learned manual work and high productivity requirements. With this hard-earned money, he enjoyed traveling around the country, but meanwhile realized it wouldn’t be easy for him to settle permanently in Australia. He then decided to go back to Europe for an job in investment banking at Crédit Agricole CIB in Frankfort, Germany. He stayed there for two years and used his free time to discover new areas of interest, taking advantage of the spread of MOOC courses. The Kiva Fellowship is the start of his journey to a career in microfinance.

Fellows Blog Posts by Victor Prevot

Sep 25, 2017 GH Ghana

Meeting with Kiva borrowers is a privilege that I have had the opportunity to enjoy multiple times since I have landed in Africa. Oftentimes, their stories, professional or personal, have made me forget the initial reason for my visit. Every single story has something special, and you never know what to expect until you arrive at their home, sit on a wobbly seat and start listening. Whether they are touching, inspiring, heartbreaking or promising, stories always move me deeply.   My name is Victor, a Kiva fellow based in Cape Coast, Ghana, and I wish to introduce you to Joyce - a Kiva... Continue Reading >>


May 17, 2017 TZ Tanzania

Today, we are heading off to Morogoro, name given to both the town and its larger district. In fact, our journey ends in a rustic village called Kisemu. Located an eight-hour drive away from Dar-es-salaam, the main economic city that concentrates 90% of Tanzania's wealth, our destination has fair chances to be contrastingly remote and poor.   Once we arrive there, not without trouble as the rainy season reaches its peak, we enjoy a delicious meal, a soup made with locally bred chicken, then have a long night sleep to have us ready for the next day: we will have some young women to... Continue Reading >>